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Latinx Studies



Bienvenidos | Welcome

Whatever word you use, the UO welcomes Ducks from everywhere, whether they're from another state or country, or have ancestors who made the journey before them. The university is always working to be a more welcoming home to the students, faculty members, and staff from the diverse Latinx community. 

 

 

 

The Minor

The Latinx Studies minor is for students across all majors who want to learn more about the perspectives and experiences of Latinx communities in the US and Latin America.  

Your path, your way: 

After you complete the required Introduction to Ethnic Studies (ES 101) course, you’ll choose from courses across more than 14 departments from 5 different colleges on campus to fit your interests. Love performing arts? Take a course in the School of Music and Dance. Is history and politics your jam? We’ve got you covered. The Latinx minor program is designed to encourage broad learning, so all students are required to take at least one course in the social sciences, humanities, and one in a professional school on campus.  

Through completing the 24 credits needed for the Latinx Studies minor, you’ll have the opportunity to learn from multiple departments, and connect with other students and faculty from around the entire university. 

Requirement Checklist

Apply To Minor

                                         


LATINX AT THE UO BY THE NUMBERS

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

12%

WE HAVE MORE THAN TRIPLED THE NUMBER OF LATINX UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS IN THE LAST 20 YEARS

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

7.6%
WE HAVE MORE THAN DOUBLED THE NUMBER OF LATINX GRADUATE STUDENTS IN THE LAST 20 YEARS

FACULTY AND EMPLOYEES 

5.5%
WE HAVE ALMOST DOUBLED THE NUMBER OF LATINX FACULTY AND EMPLOYEES IN THE LAST 20 YEARS

 

 


Latinx Scholars

​​The Latinx (Latina/Latino) Academic Residential Community aims to create and promote a positive and supportive space that eases your transition as first year students into University of Oregon life, while empowering you to become prominent campus leaders. The term Latinx (pronounced “lə•tee'•nex”) is an inclusive term that represents the singular and plural forms. It is used to describe people, not things.  It is sometimes used as an umbrella term to include Latin-Americans (regardless of country of origin), Mexican-Americans, Central Americans, Chicanx, or Hispanics. It is also a gender neutral inclusive term, encompassing all genders including non-binary identified individuals. Through connections to other students with similar interests and/or cultural backgrounds and connections to faculty and academic support on campus, you can shape your intellectual journey while changing the face of the university. The Latinx ARC and its theme creates a common bond for all residents— Latinx and non-Latinx alike—that will foster cross-cultural understanding.

Explore Community Options

 

A Message from the Director

It is with great excitement that I take on the role of director of the new Latinx Studies program at the University of Oregon. This program has been years in the making,and it’s the result of work done by a committed group of faculty and staff, most notably in the department of Indigenous, Race, and Ethnic Studies. Their commitment to the education of Latina, Latino, and Latinx students at the university is boundless, and I owe a deep debt of gratitude to the department.

Audrey Lucero

A primary goal of the new program is to support students in getting a minor in Latinx Studies. This minor provides a great opportunity for students to learn more about the experiences and perspectives of Latinx communities in the United States and Latin America. In these times of fraught and politicized conversations about immigration, it is easy for many to forget that Latinx people have always been in what is now the United States. I can speak to this personally, as my own family has been in the southwestern United States for more than 300 years. My grandmother was born in the New Mexico territory in 1907 – five years before it became a state. Thus, my family is not immigrants. Rather, the United States came to us. And yet, many Americans don’t know about the histories of Latinx people like me, nor do they appreciate the contributions that have been made by generations of Latinx people who arrived after my ancestors.

It is my hope that the Latinx Studies program will provide ample opportunities for the university community to come together to learn more about the linguistic, cultural, and academic contributions Latinx people have made – and continue to make – to our university, community, and country. We especially welcome students hoping to learn more about their own experience of Latinidad, like I did as I moved through college and into adulthood.  In addition to the minor, we will offer a robust slate of programming, and we can’t wait to see what comes next.

If you have any questions about Latinx Studies, please don’t hesitate to reach out and contact me at alucero@uoregon.edu.

- Audrey Lucero

 

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EVENTS

 

Nkame: A Retrospective of Cuban Printmaker Belkis Ayón
Mar1
Nkame: A Retrospective of Cuban Printmaker Belkis Ayón Mar 1
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